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A reading and discussion series marking the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Wilderness Act will be hosted by the library in May and June in a five-part program sponsored by the Idaho Humanities Council.
Up to 25 participants in the series – “Wilderness Considered” – will be able to borrow copies of two books and a binder of other readings prior to the start of the scholar-led discussions scheduled for Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the Community Room on May 14 and 21, and June 4, 11, and 18.
There is no charge to participate and discussions will be open to the public whether or not attendees have read the books and essays. The books for the series include: “American Wilderness: A New History,” edited by Michael Lewis, Oxford University Press, 2007, and “Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter Alone in the Wilderness, by Pete Fromm, Picador Press, 2003.
The books and binders will be available at the library on May 1. The deadline to register as an active participant – those committed to attending all five discussions – is May 9.
This program is made possible in part by the Idaho Humanities Council, the state based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
For more information contact David Townsend, Library Communications Coordinator, at 208-769-2315 Ext. 426 or by e-mail at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315.

The next “Novel Destinations” program at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library,  Friday, April 25, at 7 p.m., will take its audience to China where a local man’s foundation is helping young students to get an education and create a library.
“The Chinese Kids Project,” a slideshow by Ron Deady, will be presented on the big screen in the Community Room at the library, 702 E. Front Ave.
Deady is a retired military and commercial pilot. He started a Foundation in China in 2006 called The Chinese Kids Project in Yunnan Province, in the town of Xundian.
He travels to China each year, selects recipients for a “scholarship,” and awards 20 children with a red envelope to assist them financially. Another effort buys books to build a library for grade-schoolers. The story and photos relate how the projects started and progress is an interesting one, full of Chinese intrigue, humor, and hope for better detente.
Sponsored by the Affinity Living Community in Coeur d’Alene, this will be an after-hours library program with refreshments.
The free “Novel Destinations” programs were created by the Library Foundation to give people in the community an opportunity to share their travel stories and photos. Anyone with a potential slideshow for the series is asked to call the Foundation office at 208-769-2380 or to e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

In just the past decade changing technology has influenced the services that are expected from libraries. The Coeur d’Alene Public Library wants to know how well we have responded and where improvement is needed.
During April library users are being asked how they use the technology at the library by responding to an online survey made available by the Information School at the University of Washington.
To participate go to the library website: www.cdalibrary.org and the survey link will appear automatically.
The Impact Survey is anonymous, available in English and Spanish, and takes 10-15 minutes to complete. Responses are confidential and the survey does not collect any personally identifiable information.
 The Impact Survey is the result of a successful research initiative from the University of Washington with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In 2009, the University of Washington Information School conducted “Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries,” the first large-scale investigation of the ways U.S. library patrons use computers and the Internet at public libraries, why they use it, and how it impacts their lives.