19.05.2018

Name of library contest changed to honor former director

The winners of the 2018 Writers Competition at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library were recognized Saturday in a ceremony that also saw a name change for the 29-year-old contest to honor a former library director, the competition’s founder.
At its April meeting, the Library Board of Trustees requested that the name be changed to the Julie Meier Writers Competition.
Serving as library director from 1981 to 2004, Meier created the Writers Competition in 1989 to reward writing excellence, to encourage area residents – especially children – to writes, and, in her words, “to discover talented writers in our midst.”
Julie Meir passed away this year on April 12.
Cash prizes for Writers Competition were originally funded by Hecla Mining. In recent years prizes have been funded by grants from the Coeur d’Alene Kiwanis Club and the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
All entries in the competition are placed in professionally bound books that are added to the library’s collection as non-circulating items. The collection of bound entries going back to 1989 can be found in the library’s Nelson History Room.
For 2018 the competition underwent two major changes. The fee to enter the competition was eliminated and the age groups were changed to reflect school grade levels for non-adult competitors.
The winners for 2018 in the Julie Meier Writers Competition and their entries are:
► Grades K-2 Fiction/Nonfiction: First, Mikayla Moore, Athol , “Animal World: Big Cats;” Second    Maren Larson, Coeur d’Alene, “The Moon;” and Third, Aubrey Keinert, Priest River, “Bunny and the Bear.”
► Grades 3-5 Nonfiction: First, Trent Roberts, Spirit Lake, “A Different Kind of Christmas;” Second, Alexander Beresford-Wood, Post Falls, “My Essay on the Best Dad on Earth;” and Third, Gabrielle Hill, Coeur d’Alene, “Pocahontas’ Impact on American History.”
► Grades 6-8 Nonfiction: First, Jane Robinette, Otis Orchards, Wash., “The Wonderful World of Books;” Second, Samantha Hayes, Post Falls, “Careless Consumptions;” and Third, Sophie Nungesser, Post Falls, “Should There be Tougher Punishments for Bullying?”
► Grades 9-12 Nonfiction: First, Isaiah Harrison, Coeur d’Alene, “The Pain Game;” Second, Isaac Harrison, Coeur d’Alene, “The Dark and Silent Place;” Third, Peyton Jerome, Coeur d’Alene, “PTSD in the Ancient World.”
► Adult Nonfiction: First, Victoria Collins, Coeur d’Alene, “When Time Stands Still;” Second , Brenda Bergelin, Coeur d’Alene, “At Fifty-Four;” Third, Sherry Groeschl, Coeur d’Alene, “One Call Away.”
► Grades 3-5 Fiction: First, Zachery Linford, Coeur d’Alene, “Am I a Turtle or a Tortoise?” Third, Verity Zichek, and Hauser, “Cemetery Sojourn;” Second, Alyssa Harrison, Coeur d’Alene, “The Tale of Louis and the Moonlight.”
► Grades 6-8 Fiction: First, Lillian Syren, Coeur d’Alene, “Refuge in the Wilderness;” Second, Emma Crownhart, Liberty Lake, Wash., “The Princes’ Game;” Third, Mercedesz Juhasz, Post Falls, “Euphoria.”
► Grades 9-12 Fiction:  First, Lyssa Bivens, Spirit Lake, “Rainbow Trout;” Second, Jessica Gates, Hayden, “Sirens of War;” Third, Samuel Cuentas, Post Falls, “A Moment Before Chaos.”
► Adult Fiction: First, Rebecca Crouse, Rathdrum, “Her Footsteps Linger;” Second, Angela Gates, Hayden, “Snow Falling White;” Third, Kevin Zirker, Post Falls, “Postical.”

18.11.2017

The Cooperative Information Network (CIN) – which includes the Coeur d'Alene and Lake City public libraries a group of 27 other libraries in North Idaho and eastern Washington – now offers the Mango Languages online language-learning system to its patrons.
Mango is free for all library patrons and can be accessed anywhere with an Internet connection. Each lesson combines real-life situations and audio from native speakers with simple, clear instructions. The courses are presented with an appreciation for cultural nuance and real-world application by focusing on the four key elements of language learning: vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and culture.
Mango offers access to 60 foreign language courses and 17 English courses taught completely in the user’s native language. In addition to traditional language courses, Mango also offers the opportunity to learn through foreign film with Mango Premiere™ and access to a variety of specialty mini courses, like Pirate, Medical Spanish and romance courses. Mango can be accessed at the library, remotely, or even on-the-go with apps for iPhone®, Android™, Kindle® and Nook®.
“We are thrilled to join the growing list of libraries across the country that offer Mango to their patrons,” said Coeur d’Alene Public Library Director Bette Ammon. “Some people need to learn a second language for business or travel. Others want to for personal or professional development. No matter the reason, learning a language should be fun.”
To learn more about Mango, stop by a CIN member library and ask a librarian for an introduction. Library card holders can access Mango through their nearest library’s website.
The libraries of the Cooperative Information Network share a computer catalog, circulation services and a common library card in order to provide patrons in North Idaho and eastern Washington with better and more convenient access to library services and materials. The shared catalog can be accessed at: www.cinlibraries.org or through any of the websites for the CIN member libraries.
Founded in 2007, Mango Languages is the leading provider of language-learning resources in North American libraries. Mango is privately owned and headquartered in Farmington Hills, Mich. Guided by its core purpose to enrich lives with language and culture, Mango Languages creates lovable language-learning experiences for libraries, schools, corporations, government agencies, and individuals. To learn more about the company visit www.mangolanguages.com.

19.06.2017

Internet access is a necessity for most job searches, careers, school work, and popular entertainment, but nearly a third of local families do not have access to the Internet unless they visit places like the Coeur d’Alene Public Library where they can use computers or the free Wi-Fi.
Through a grant of $10,875 from the Inland Northwest Community Foundation obtained by the Coeur d’Alene Public Library Foundation, the library now offers patrons “Internet to go.”
“This is a significant step in bridging the digital divide in our community,” said Library Director Bette Ammon. “This grant helps us provide access to the world for patrons who need to connect to family and friends, do online banking and job searches, use school resources, and for entertainment.”
Ben Drake, president of the Library Foundation, said that his group is proud of the role they played in obtaining the grant.
“The Library Foundation was involved in fundraising to build the physical library which opened 10 years ago,” he said. “We want to continue to help the library grow by enhancing the resources it offers the community.”
The library has 25 hotspots – portable devices used to create a wireless Internet access point – available to check out to library cardholders. The devices can be checked out for four weeks and can be renewed for an additional four weeks as long as there are no holds placed on them.
These hotspots can be used through the T-Mobile Network even if the user does not have cell phone, landline, or cable television service. Users can access the Internet from any location served by T-Mobile using a laptop, tablet, smart phone, or other wireless-equipped devices. They can also be used in conjunction with Rokus, or similar devices that permit streaming movies or other shows from the Internet. The library also has Rokus available to check out.
The hotspots will be checked out with instructions on how to use the devices and assistance will also be available from the library staff.

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